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Audio Best Practices: Manage Your Session

When hosting an important session, you have a variety of tools available that can ensure your audio quality remains high.

This article applies to: Web Conferencing, Zoom


Use Different Computers for Presenter and Host Roles

When setting up an important session, particularly if you are providing a computer for presenters, do not use the same computer for both host and presenter roles.  Having the host connected from a computer that is not being used to present will allow the host to use audio controls and mute options to fix audio problems without having to interrupt the presentation. 

Enable Mute on Entry

Some services (such as WebEx Training Center and Event Center) give you the option of Mute on Entry (Participant > Mute On Entry). This will automatically mute all attendees when they join and will prevent them from generating audio unless they are first unmuted. Depending on the type of session, they may be able to unmute themselves or the Host may have to do it.

Audio Issues? Try Mute All

If there are issues like ambient noise, feedback, or echo, the fastest remedy is to use Mute All. This will mute all attendees except the presenter and the host. If the problem is originating from a particular attendee, using Mute All should fix it. If it reoccurs, you may be able identify its source by looking through the participant list to see who has unmuted. 

Another Option: Mute Individual Participants

It's also possible to try to identify and mute the specific source of unwanted audio (instead of using Mute All). Participants in the audio conference have an audio icon near their name. There is also an indicator for who is speaking. If you can correlate the timing of audio interference with a particular person speaking, it may identify that person as a possible source, and you can try muting them individually.

As a Last Resort, Expel is Available

If you have identified a particular participant as a source of audio problems and tried muting them and communicating to them privately to manage their audio, but they persist in unmuting themselves and causing interference, as a last resort you can expel that participant.  

About this Article

Last updated: 

Friday, June 30, 2017 - 3:43pm

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